Author: ccrblogger

Mixers 101 – common misconceptions that impact performance

Content adapted from Hobart & FES magazine

Whether you need a mixer for continuous use or the occasional batch, it’s important to have the right equipment for the job. A mixer that isn’t sized right can affect performance and increase costs. Learning these common misconceptions about mixers will help you make the best selection for the tasks performed and provide a long life in your correctional kitchen.

Misconception 1: Larger Motor Equals More Power

When it comes to mixers, remember that advertised horsepower won’t give you a complete picture of expected performance. A larger motor doesn’t mean the mixer will provide you with more power. Instead, check the mixer’s efficiency and torque, which affect the ability to drive the agitator into the bowl. This ensures that product is mixed thoroughly. The type of drive system the mixer has is a key factor here. For example the Hobart® Legacy® mixers with Variable Frequency Drive use a variable-speed motor and a single gear train to regulate the frequency and voltage of the electric current to the motor. This drive regulates the mixer speed so that it will increase or decrease to put the right amount of torque into the bowl to make sure ingredients are consistently mixed every time. If a mixer needs a larger motor to drive the same amount of torque as a smaller motor would drive, too much energy is being used to accomplish the task. When this is happening, components can become hotter faster and it can lead to premature motor failure, costly repairs and even replacement.

Misconception 2: More Is Always Better

It is best to determine the size and type of mixer you require by reviewing how you will be using the mixer. First, be sure to select the correct bowl size so that you won’t tax the motor. Sometimes a larger bowl will be needed, but not always; you use the absorption ratio to determine this. To calculate the absorption ratio, water weight is divided by flour weight. This is important because the recommended maximum capacity of the mixer depends on the moisture content of the dough. For example, on the Hobart mixer capacity chart, the capacities are based on an absorption rate calculation formula of 12% flour moisture at 70-degree Fahrenheit water temperature. Also, your kitchen may not require a maximum heavy-duty mixer. If the mixer is used periodically for heavy dough or limited batch use, a standard heavy-duty mixer would be a better choice. A good rule of thumb is if you are doing less than four hours of mixing daily. Anything more than that is better served with a maximum heavy-duty mixer.

Misconception 3: Routine Maintenance Isn’t Critical

Routine maintenance is important for any piece of kitchen equipment to reduce problems and extend the productive life of the equipment. Mixers have lubrication points like the actuators which are involved in lifting and lowering the bowl that need regular attention. You can save yourself future trouble by following the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding how much and how often you grease these points. Also, you need to be sure you do not wipe off all the grease when you are cleaning because this may prevent the bowl from moving up and down correctly.

It is important to pay attention to the bowl clearance to see that it stays consistent. You can damage the bowl if the agitator is hitting the bottom and if the agitator isn’t positioned properly in the bowl, your ingredients will not get mixed thoroughly. You can refer to the operator’s manual for adjustment instructions.

It’s also recommended that you have your mixer inspected by a service provider annually as a proactive means of equipment maintenance. Taking care of heavy-duty kitchen equipment with regular maintenance will reduce your expenses in the long-term and extend the life or your equipment in your correctional foodservice operation.

Made For Corrections Mondays – Sentry Series Spork

Today’s edition of Made For Corrections Mondays is all about the Sentry Series Spork. This is a truly unique piece of flatware that offers a safer way for inmates to eat. The Sentry Series Spork is made from a soft plastic that can be bent without breaking and it will return to it’s original shape. Because it cannot be broken, inmates cannot sharpen the Sentry Series Spork into a weapon.

If you have any questions about our Sentry Series Spork, or other Cook’s Brand products, give us a call at 800-956-5571 or visit us online at cookscorrectional.com. We can also assist you in finding the best heavy-duty kitchen equipment and supplies for the correctional kitchen.

What can you do with a Tilt Skillet?

The Tilt Skillet or Braising Pan is one of the most versatile pieces of correctional kitchen equipment available. With the capacity to saute, grill, fry, steam, or braise, these multitasking dynamos are all about helping institutional kitchens do more with less. We recommend them when you have limited space because one tilt skillet can be used to steam, grill and even to fry foods.

Below is a quick demonstration of the Vulcan V-Series Tilt Skillet. We recommend Vulcan equipment because it has proven itself many times over in correctional kitchen applications throughout the years as highly durable and long lasting heavy-duty kitchen equipment.

If you’re interested in learning more about tilt-skillets or other Vulcan Foodservice Equipment, give us a call and we will be happy to assist you. We have access to their full line of commercial kitchen equipment and are fully trained on their product line.

Made For Corrections Mondays – Rite-Size Servers

Happy first day of Autumn and another Made For Corrections Mondays. This week’s edition features our Rite-Size Servers. These portion control serving utensils come in seven sizes to accommodate most anything on your correctional menu. We have 2,3,4,6,8,10 & 12 oz servers. Each Cook’s Brand Rite-size Server is a different color to make it easy to visually identify if the right size is being used on the tray assembly line and the capacity is marked clearly on the handle. In this video Jeff Breeden, CEO of Cook’s, tells you how these servers are Made for Corrections.

Visit Cook’s online – The leader in correctional kitchen equipment and supplies.

Made for Corrections Mondays is a video series featuring a variety of foodservice kitchen equipment and supplies and highlights how they are Made for Corrections. All the videos are short and informative.

Be sure to check back next Monday to learn the unique challenges facing jail and prison foodservice operations and the corresponding Cook’s Brand product solutions that are Made For Corrections.

New Multi-terrain Mobility™ Carts

Lakeside introduces their new heavy duty utility cart with features that could revolutionize the utility cart as we know it.  The unique articulating handle design on these carts allows for the maximum leverage with heavy loads over all types of surfaces.   The 42” handle height is ergonomic for utmost leverage and easier push/pull maneuverability. If you need two-person guided transport for challenging outdoor use, you can take advantage of the dual-handle design included on this cart.

These mobility carts are equipped with rugged casters, two rigid and two swivel with brake. The large wheels roll smoothly over thresholds and uneven surfaces. Casters are 6″ or 8″ pneumatic.

The rugged design on these stainless steel carts feature durable U-frame welded construction, reinforced top shelf, and a 700 lb. total load capacity. The shelves have edges on three sides to hold cargo securely while providing easy loading and unloading. They are built to carry the heaviest cargo loads across rough terrains and long distances making them an ideal cart in the correctional environment.

Lakeside set out to build a cart that would allow operators to transport items across a variety of terrains easily and improve efficiency, under the toughest conditions.  And that’s exactly what they did.  They plan to offer this option on their full line. To learn more about these carts, you can view the spec sheet or call Cook’s at 800-956-5571 for additional details.

Made For Corrections Mondays – Mini Spork

Welcome to another edition of Made For Corrections Mondays with Jeff Breeden. This week, you’ll be introduced to the Mini Spork, a unique ‘little’ eating utensil designed to flow through a 3″ waste pipe. It will have you saying, only in corrections. Click below to learn more.

Made for Corrections Mondays is a video series featuring a variety of foodservice kitchen equipment and supplies and highlights how they are Made for Corrections. All the videos are short and informative.

Be sure to check back next Monday to learn the unique challenges facing jail and prison foodservice operations and the corresponding Cook’s Brand product solutions that are Made For Corrections.

Welcome to Made for Corrections Monday

We’ve been in corrections for over 20 years, and so have many of our customers. It’s always interesting; maybe even amusing, when someone who isn’t in the industry finds out that you specialize in correctional foodservice. The first question is often something like – how is that a specialty? I like to respond with the obvious”picture yourself in a confined area with several inmates using very sharp knives.” It is fun to watch the dawning of awareness in their eyes and then the questions about how you address the unique challenges of the correctional kitchen begin; like sharp knives and inmates to start.

That’s what Made for Corrections Mondays is all about. This new series will introduce you to a variety of correctional foodservice kitchen equipment and supplies and highlight how they are Made for Corrections.

In these videos Jeff Breeden, CEO of Cook’s, will demonstrate kitchen products that help solve a challenge that is unique to corrections. Usually these product will help you improve security and safety or they are made to outlast inmate abuse. But some items have very specific backstories, like a spork that is designed to be flushed down a toilet and not cause an overflow. All of the videos are quick and informative.

We’re glad to have you join us for Made for Corrections Mondays. And if you have a product suggestion, question or a challenge in your facility that you need help solving, send an email to cmeneou@cooksdirect.com or give us a call at 1-800-956-5571. Thanks for watching and be sure to come back next week for another edition of Made for Corrections Monday.

Designed for Tray Make-Up in Corrections

The Correctional Tray Assembly Line from Cook’s is one of the earliest Cook’s Brand Products. In this video, Jeff Breeden, CEO of Cook’s, demonstrates many of the features that make this heavy-duty tray assembly line unique from other similar equipment solutions and how it is designed and engineered for corrections.

We introduced the Cook’s Brand Correctional Tray Assembly Line because the tray lines available on the general market aren’t built to be operated by staff that wants to break the legs, punch out the controls, turn over the tray line or destroy the rollers so they can make a weapon from the parts. And in a hospital cafeteria, that’s okay; but in a jail, you need corner braces, cross channel supports and welded leg gussets to keep things intact. You need a recessed control panel with a locking cover and a wide base so the line is too big to turn over easily. You also need one-piece rollers that are easy to clean, but don’t come apart so an inmate can use the shaft as a weapon and you get all this with the Cook’s Brand Correctional Tray Assembly Line. Plus your time to deliver meals will be faster because this line is designed to place inmates at optimal distance apart and from the food for efficient tray make-up. The gravity conveyor will also keep trays moving at the ideal speed; 17 to 20 trays per minute, providing an hourly production of about 1,000 + trays.

If you want to learn more about the correctional tray assembly line – watch the video and give us a call at 1-800-956-5571. Because it’s a Cook’s Brand product, we have standard models that can be fitted for your operation or customized to meet your specific needs.

On the road again….

Cook's Correctional ACA 2019 Summer Conference in Boston, MA Booth #1112

The Cook’s team is in Boston, MA this week at the 2019 ACA Summer Conference to showcase many of our most popular products and to meet customers and contacts that made their way to the east coast for the conference. The American Correctional Association has two large conferences a year; the winter conference held in early January each year and the summer conference in August. This year the conference is at Boston’s John B Haynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center.

If you too are on the road for the ACA Summer Conference, stop by and see us in booth #1112. You can meet Linda and Craig who are pictured above in out booth, along with Chadd, John and Jeff. You can also the Rhino M-102 meal delivery cart designed specifically for corrections, our new Raised Compartment Marathon Tray and our popular Flex products and Kettle Tools.

Have you seen Gordon Ramsey Behind Bars?

1st video in the Gordon Ramsey Behind Bars Series

Most of us have heard the name Gordon Ramsey and have a sense of his aggressive kitchen management style that is a hallmark in his TV shows. Gordon Behind Bars is a British television series in which Gordon Ramsay teaches inmates of Brixton prison, just about five minutes from Ramsay’s residence, how to cook.

While it’s in Britain and not the US, there’s plenty that should feel familiar. The objective is to get the inmates working and generating income for the facility and in the process, learning a skill that will give them a future. Many of our contacts have culinary programs in their facility with the goal of educating inmates for their future on the outside. Take a look at the video. Do you see any similarities to your correctional foodservice operations? Does the correctional kitchen equipment look like what you are using here? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.