Month: December 2014

Holidays mean baking! Understand your baking pans.

Loaf Pans from Carlisle

Loaf Pans from Carlisle

To meet the various needs of your food service operation, you’ll find baking pans in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and materials.  When you’re choosing a pan, be it a loaf pan, muffin pan or sheet pan it’s good to see what the market says about those pans or to see what you are using currently that you prefer to cook with in your operation. The different materials, thickness and design of the pan will impact your final product – and you don’t want to end up with foods that stick to your pans or are burnt on the edges and not fully cooked in the center.

Following is a break down of options you’ll find in baking pans:

Popular brands: Carlisle, FSE, Focus Foodservice, Vollrath, Economy

Types of pans:  Bread Pans or Loaf Pans, Cake Pans, Cupcake Pans or Muffin Pans, Pie Pans, Hot Dog Pans, Sheet Pans, Springform Pans, Hamburger Bun Pans

Baking Pan Sizes: Varies on application.  The size of baking pans depends greatly on its type.  Loaf pans range from around 6 x 3 inches to 12 x 4 inches.  Cupcake pans or muffin pans accommodate 24 3-1/2 oz cupcakes and cake pans are available up to 18 x 24 inches.  Sheet pans come in full (18  x 24 inches), half (13 x 18 inches) and quarter (9 x 13 inches) sizes.  These will accommodate many different types of baked goods.

Materials: Stainless Steel, Steel, Tin-plated, Aluminum.  Baking pans are generally made from aluminum or stainless steel. Aluminum is a better conductor of heat and less expensive than stainless steel is and it will promote more even baking, however, it is reactive to acidic foods so this can give food a metallic flavor which will not happen with stainless steel.  Aluminized steel baking pans, which are steel that is coated with aluminum-silicon alloy, are the most common./

Finish:  Non-stick or Natural.  Some baking pans have non-stick surfaces while others retain their natural, uncoated surfaces.  The obvious benefit to a non-stick pan is that foods are easily removed from the pan and edges stay intact.  Often these pans are darker in color and require an adjustment in the baking temperature and time.  The finish is often up to the preference of the chef.

All types of baking pans can be found on Cook’s Correctional in the baking pan category.

 

CCP – Critical Control Point

In the US, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) establishes minimum internal temperatures for cooked foods.

FSE Precision Digital Thermometer

FSE Precision Digital Thermometer

It is important to remember that these values can be superseded by state or local health code requirements, but they cannot be below the FDA limits.  Temperatures should be measured with a probe thermometer in the thickest part of the meats, or the center of other dishes, avoiding bones and container sides.  Minimum internal temperatures are set as follows:

165 degrees F (74 degrees C) for 15 seconds:

  • Poultry (such as whole or ground chicken, turkey, or duck)
  • Stuffing
  • Stuffed meats, fish, poultry and pasta
  • Any previously cooked foods that are reheated from a temperature below 135 degrees F (57 degrees C), provided they have been refrigerated or warm less than 2 hours
  • Any potentially hazardous foods cooked in a microwave, such as poultry, meat, fish or eggs

155 degrees F (68 degrees C) for 15 seconds

  • Ground meats (such as beef or pork)
  • Injected meats (such as flavor-injected roasts or brined hams)
  • Ground or minced fish
  • Eggs that will be held for a length of time before eaten

145 degrees F (63 degrees C) for 15 seconds

  • Steaks and chops such as beef, pork, veal and lamb
  • Fish
  • Eggs cooked for immediate service

145 degrees F (63 degrees C) for 4 minutes

  • Roasts (can be cooked to lower temperatures for increased lengths of time)

135 degrees F (57 degrees C) for 15 seconds

  • Cooked fruits or vegetables that will be held for a length of time before eaten
  • Any commercially processed, ready-to-eat foods that will be held for a length of time before eaten.

In addition, hot food must be held at a minimum internal temperature of 135 degrees F (57 degrees C) if it is not immediately consumed.  The temperature must be checked every 4 hours or else labeled with a discard time.  Although monitored hot food can be held indefinitely in this way without a food safety concern, the nutritional value, flavor and quality can suffer over long periods.

You can find more helpful cooking information in the resource section of the Cook’s Correctional Buyers Guide which is available for viewing on CooksCorrectional.com.